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poll: scooby-doo or marmaduke?

10 May 2011

Unless you happen upon a great dane specialty show, you don’t see that many great danes in public. You’ll see a few on TV and none more famous than Marmaduke and Scooby-Doo.

MW asked me to run a poll about pop culture’s most famous Deutsches Dogges?

Who would you prefer to take home from the pound?

A big great dane born in the 1950s, or a big great dane born in the late 1960s?

Marmaduke or Scooby-Doo?

Marmaduke Cartoon: napping on sofa

Marmaduke: more than 50 years of moderate to low humor

Marmaduke

Born in 1954, he’s a child of the nuclear age, and still syndicated in newspapers around the world. Creator Brad Anderson, who is now well into his 80s, has long-described being inspired by Laurel and Hardy comedy.

The single panel jokes invariably poke fun at Marmaduke’s size, food consumption, self-centeredness, and courting of local poodles.

A live action/animation movie starring Owen Wilson (and a host of other obviously desperate actors) opened in June, 2010 and promptly bombed.

Marmaduke on Sofa cartoon

our great dane luna already does this

I watch a lot of movies and Marmaduke the movie, has the worst IMDB.com rating-–3.4/10-–of any film I’ve ever researched. That’s two hours of my life I, thankfully, won’t waste.

According to Wikipedia’s Marmaduke entry, the 1950s dog was inspiration for an even more-well known great dane that came off the drawing board 15 years later.

Scooby-Doo

You know you’ve made it in life, either individually (LeBron) or corporately (to Google something) when whatever you do enters the popular lexicon as either a verb or noun. You know when you‘ve really made it when one of the companies that has itself been turned into a verb turns you into a doodle and you grace the front page of one of the world’s most visited web pages.

This is what happened when Google celebrated Scooby-Doo on Halloween 2010 with this multi-paneled Google Doodle.

The frames, clicking through one by one, showed the world’s most famous great dane and friends solving the mystery behind the missing word Google in the doodle.

Google Scooby Doo Doodle

and i would have gotten away with it, too, if it weren't for you meddling kids!"

The Dog as Cash Cow

For Hanna-Barbera Productions, creators of The Flintstones, Yogi Bear, The Jetsons and Tom and Jerry, this great dane has been a veritable cash cow that has dependably added to the bottom line for 40 years.

Designed by Hanna-Barbera artist Iwao Takamoto based on input from a co-worker who bred great danes, Scooby-Doo has appeared in multiple animated TV series, two feature-length movies, and several lame direct-to-video and TV specials.

Scooby-Doo

will work (a bit) for lots of food

Those Meddling Kids and a Merchandising Empire

But wait, there’s more! His iconic design–a double chin, overly bowed legs, and a sloped back–hasn’t just appeared in multiplexes and on TV screens.

It’s also appeared on millions of lunch boxes, backpacks, posters, spiral bound notebooks, and underwear. In 1973, Milton Bradley released the first of several board games. Don’t forget the arcade video game that appeared in 1986, multivitamins that Bayer has manufactured since 2001, or breakfast cereal. Or the Shaggy and Scooby-Doo characters at Universal Studios Florida, or the live stage plays, Stagefright and Scooby-Doo and the Pirate Ghost.

Whew, that’s a hell of a lot of merchandising revenue. That’s way more than a cash cow…that’s a cash herd.

OK, in terms of revenue, Scooby comes out way ahead. Not that Brad Anderson, though, needs to work at his local Jack in the Box to supplement his Social Security check. He’s done just fine chronicling for half a century the life of an impulsive  200 lb dog.

Decision Time: Marmaduke or Scooby-Doo?

So, who would it be?

You go to the pound and see Marmaduke and Scooby-Doo (without Shaggy or the Mystery Machine). What would you do?

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One Comment leave one →
  1. 10 May 2011 8:51 pm

    Marmaduke is the best

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